Meet Senator Jennifer McClellan
Jennifer McClellan's legislation is signed into law
Jennifer McClellan at the General Assembly
Jennifer McClellan accepting the VEA Legislative Champion Award
Jennifer McClellan supporting funding for Public Broadcasting

Latest News

Jul5

Between 2004 and 2013, around 4,500 children under the age of 18 were married in Virginia. Of that 4,500, more than 200 were 15 or younger. Finally, last Friday, authorities introduced new legislation that updated rules that had, until then, made it entirely legal for girls aged 12 or 13 to be married so long as they had parental consent and were pregnant.

Jul5

And shockingly, people were actually utilising the law. Figures show that between 2004 and 2013, 4,500 children under 18 were married, and of those 200 were younger than 15-years-old. 90% of those marrying underage were girls, and in most cases they married men age 21 or older.

Jul5

Youtube prankster Coby Persin recently took to Times Square to photograph himself and his ‘wife’, who was 12 years old, in order to raise awareness of the long-standing legality of young marriage in Virginia. As a result, New Yorkers were stunned at the obscenity, and thus the state of Virginia has now passed a bill that update previous laws on marriage, which until now made it legally sound for girls aged 12 or 13 to be married, on the grounds of parental consent and of them being pregnant. The legal age has now been amended to 18.

Jul4

Between 2004 and 2013, around 4,500 children under the age of 18 got married in the state of Virginia. Of these girls, more than 200 of them were aged 15 or under. Last week, the authorities in the state introduced new legislation that updated rules that had until then made it legal for girls aged 12 or 13 to get married if they had parental consent and were pregnant. The changes - a move that campaigners said brought Virginia’s laws into the 21st Century - followed a long fight by activists who said the change was aimed at curbing forced marriage, human trafficking and statutory rape disguised as marriage.

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The General Assembly adjourned Sine Die on March 11th, one day early, after completing work on thousands of bills and a $105 billion two-year budget.   The Governor has until midnight, April 11th to sign, amend, or veto the legislation on his desk.  On Wednesday, April 20th, the General Assembly will return for Reconvened Session to consider the Governor's amendments and vetoes.

We are nearing the finish line for the 2016 General Assembly Session, with a little over a week to go.  Last week, the House and the Senate acted on their respective budgets. The House budget proposal, outlined below, has a number of positive items, including pay increases for state employees and increased spending on public schools. However, both the House and Senate budgets remove funding for Medicaid expansion, leaving hundreds of thousands of Virginians without access to quality health care services.

Today marks the mid-way point of the session, known as "Crossover". This is the date by which each chamber must complete work on its own bills. Before the end of the day, we will vote on hundreds of bills on the House floor, covering charter schools, juvenile justice reform, economic development, certificate of public need reform for hospitals, ethics, guns, and early childhood education.  We will address the biennial budget next week.

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