Meet Senator Jennifer McClellan
Jennifer McClellan's legislation is signed into law
Jennifer McClellan at the General Assembly
Senator McClellan Meets with constituents
Jennifer McClellan accepting the VEA Legislative Champion Award

Latest News

Feb25

Virginia legislators have rejected three bills crafted to limit school policing statewide. A pair of other related measures are still winding their way through the legislative process. 

Feb20

Sen. Jill Vogel and I have introduced legislation this year to address the very serious but overlooked issue of child marriage. With some exceptions, you must be 18 to marry in Virginia. When both parties are adults, they can better navigate the serious — and ideally lifelong — commitment that marriage entails. They also have equal access to a number of rights, privileges, and protections when things go wrong. If the marriage turns abusive, an adult victim can leave home, go to a shelter, get a protective order, or file for divorce. But what happens when children are allowed to marry? In Virginia, 16- and 17-year-olds can marry with parental consent. Children under 16 can marry with parental consent and evidence of pregnancy.

Feb20

Child marriage was not an issue of note for Jill Vogel, a state senator in Virginia, until she heard the stories circulating in her district about a man in his early 50s marrying a girl in her midteens, warding off a police investigation of his relationship with her. Now Ms. Vogel is the lead sponsor of a bill advancing in Virginia’s legislature that would sharply curtail child marriage. 

The measure has now moved to Virginia’s House of Delegates. The lead sponsor in that chamber, Jennifer McClellan, said her grandmother had gotten married at age 14 in rural Mississippi. “People didn’t understand back then that children aren’t ready to have children,” Ms. McClellan said. “Now we understand all the negative consequences.” She said she had heard no objections to the bill from prominent immigrants hailing from countries where child marriage is a centuries-old tradition. 

Feb19

Child marriage wasn’t an issue of note for Virginia state Sen. Jill Vogel until she heard the stories circulating in her district about a man in his early 50s marrying a girl in her mid-teens, warding off a police investigation of his relationship with her. Now Vogel is lead sponsor of a bill advancing in Virginia’s legislature that would sharply curtail child marriage. 

The measure has now moved the Virginia’s House of Delegates. The lead sponsor in that chamber, Jennifer McClellan, said her grandmother got married at age 14 in rural Mississippi. “People didn’t understand back then that children aren’t ready to have children,” McClellan said. “Now we understand all the negative consequences.” She’s heard no objections to the bill from prominent immigrants hailing from countries where child marriage is a centuries-old tradition. 

Our Newsletters

New Laws Take Effect

On July 1st, the majority of legislation passed by the 2018 General Assembly Session took effect.  In Due Course, published by the Division of Legislative Services, provides a good overview of new laws likely to affect the daily lives of Virginians. 

Complete information on actions of the 2018 General Assembly Session can be found on the Legislative Information System webpage.

Finally!

After five years of trying, the General Assembly passed a budget last week that includes Medicaid Expansion.

Once the Federal government approves Virginia's pan, 18-64 years olds who earn up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level will be eligible for Medicaid. This will close the coverage gap for nearly 300,000 Virginians who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid now, but not enough to qualify for subsidies on the federal health insurance marketplace. The plan includes a work requirement in which able-bodied adults under 65 are required to work, seek employment, or participate in job training, education, or community/engagement programs that improve work readiness. Exemptions are provided for children, pregnant women, the aged, disabled, and seriously mentally ill, caregivers of disabled dependents, and individuals working in the TANF VIEW program or SNAP. These requirements are waived in parts of the state with high unemployment.