Meet Senator Jennifer McClellan
Jennifer McClellan's legislation is signed into law
Jennifer McClellan at the General Assembly
Senator McClellan Meets with constituents
Jennifer McClellan accepting the VEA Legislative Champion Award

Latest News

Jul4

Between 2004 and 2013, around 4,500 children under the age of 18 got married in the state of Virginia. Of these girls, more than 200 of them were aged 15 or under. Last week, the authorities in the state introduced new legislation that updated rules that had until then made it legal for girls aged 12 or 13 to get married if they had parental consent and were pregnant. The changes - a move that campaigners said brought Virginia’s laws into the 21st Century - followed a long fight by activists who said the change was aimed at curbing forced marriage, human trafficking and statutory rape disguised as marriage.

Jul4

Up until Friday, it was possible for a girl age 13 or younger to marry in Virginia if she had parental consent and was pregnant.

Last week these archaic laws were replaced with new policies that should have been brought in years ago.

Now there is a minimum marriage age in the state — 18. Girls aged 16 or 17 can marry if they are emancipated by court order and it doesn’t matter if the teenager is pregnant or not.

Jul3

Only adults can get married in Virginia, according to a new law replacing policies that made it possible for a girl 13 or younger to marry if she had parental consent and was pregnant. The law, which took effect Friday, sets the minimum marriage age at 18, or 16 if a child is emancipated by court order. It takes parents and pregnancy out of the equation. Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel (R-Fauquier) and Del. Jennifer L. McClellan (D-Richmond) sponsored identical bills that passed during this year’s legislative session, despite some opposition.

May15

Women, more often than men, have to be asked to run for public office. Men often assume it is their time to run for elective office, while many women assume it may not be their time — especially if they have a young family, according to five women who know Virginia politics well.

The five — Amanda Chase, Anne Holton, Jennifer McClellan, Bobbie Kilberg and Jill Vogel — include two state legislators who became the first and second women ever to give birth while serving in Virginia’s General Assembly. All five shared their stories of how they found public service a worthwhile calling for women.

 
 

Our Newsletters

In this issue:

  • The surprise Senate redistricting plan
  • The defeat of several measures that would have addressed election day lines
  • My 2013 legislation
  • My RTD Op-Ed: Don’t abandon transportation-funding plan that works
  • My interview on VCTA Cable Reports
  • My commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” Speech
  • The passage of of legislation to end workplace discrimination in the Senate
  • The election of Tracy Thorne-Begland to a judgeship, and
  • The 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation

In this issue:

  • My RTD Op-Ed: Virginia Can Live Without Uranium Mines
  • The Governor’s Transportation Funding Proposal
  • Legislative Black Caucus Agenda for 2013
  • Reproductive Rights Caucus Priorities for 2013

In this issue:

  • My Column in the Richmond Times-Dispatch
  • Watch the House of Delegates Live
  • Previewing the 2013 General Assembly Session
  • Move Virginia Forward Not Back
  • Governor Introduces Budget Amendment