Meet Senator Jennifer McClellan
Jennifer McClellan's legislation is signed into law
Jennifer McClellan at the General Assembly
Senator McClellan Meets with constituents
Jennifer McClellan accepting the VEA Legislative Champion Award

Latest News

May12

Most Americans think of child marriage as a vestige of a bygone era. And yet in every state, people under 18 are allowed to marry. Some states set minimum ages for brides and grooms — sometimes as low as 13 or 14 — and usually require the permission of a parent, judge, or both before a minor can wed. But laws in about half the states allow children of any age to marry, as long as they receive the proper permission. That may be changing. This year legislators in 10 states have introduced bills to raise the marriage age.

 
May11

While some viewed the election of Donald Trump as a setback for progressive women in politics, recently an EMILY’s List conference proved it was not a defeat. 

EMILY’s List, an organization that seeks to get pro-choice Democratic women in office, brought about 300 leaders from around the country to Washington, D.C. for its “We Are Emily 2017” conference and gala on May 3. The women discussed methods to progress their agenda in a post-Trump era and participated in specialized trainings to prep them in areas such as running a campaign, managing finances, creating a donor network, and learning the difference between earned and paid media.

 
Apr10

RICHMOND, Va. – Virginia state Senator Jennifer McClellan is one of six finalists for the 2017 Gabrielle Giffords Rising Star Award. The award was established by EMILY’s List, a resource for women in politics, and it “celebrates an extraordinary woman serving in state or local office.”

“Jennifer is a fearless champion for all Virginians,” said Stephanie Schriock, president of EMILY’s List. “Her dedication to improving her local community has left a major impact in the lives of women and families across her home state. Her civil rights activism and focus on providing support to survivors of sexual violence makes her an invaluable leader in the Virginia state Senate.”

Mar19

After a hitting a legal speed bump last year that threatened its ability to do business in its home state, a Richmond-based ride-sharing startup has gotten the green light from the General Assembly.

Uzurv, an app that allows users to reserve rides through platforms like Lyft and Uber, successfully lobbied during the recent GA session to create a new classification in state code that makes its business model above board.

 

Our Newsletters

We are now in the final week of the 2017 Session. We still have quite a bit of work to do, as a number of bills, including the budget, are in conference committees to work out differences between the House and Senate versions. Last week the Senate passed a number of controversial bills.

Last week the House and Senate adopted amendments to the 2016-2018 budget to address a projected $279.3 million revenue shortfall. The Senate budget reflects its top priorities of supporting mental health programs, avoiding spending cuts for public education and safety net programs, and providing an overdue pay raise for all state employees and teachers.  Specifically, the Senate budget proposes a 3 percent raise for state classified employees, a 2 percent raise for college and university faculty, the state share of a 2 percent raise for public school teachers, and a 2 percent raise for state-supported local employees.  Instead of providing a raise for teachers, the House budget increases funding for school divisions, which may use the money for raises or for other priorities. 

 

Last week, the General Assembly reached "Crossover," the mid-point of Session when the House and Senate must complete work on their own bills. Many of the bills my constituents have written or called me about were addressed prior to crossover and summarized in prior updates. Here is an overview of other bills acted upon last week.