Meet Senator Jennifer McClellan
Jennifer McClellan's legislation is signed into law
Jennifer McClellan at the General Assembly
Senator McClellan Meets with constituents
Jennifer McClellan accepting the VEA Legislative Champion Award

Latest News

Feb4

A House of Delegates committee on Wednesday advanced comprehensive legislation aimed at strengthening Virginia’s ethics laws. The proposal would reduce the current $250 cap on gifts to public officials to $100 and remove the distinction between tangible and intangible gifts such as travel, meals and entertainment. The omnibus House Bill 2070, sponsored by Del. C. Todd Gilbert, R-Shenandoah, does not include Gov. Terry McAuliffe's proposal for an independent ethics commission with authority to investigate alleged violations. Del. Jennifer L. McClellan, D-Richmond, who carried McAuliffe’s ethics bill that was rolled into Gilbert’s proposal, said there was “a lot of common ground” between the governor’s bill and the Republican measure, “and none of that has changed.”

Feb3

McAuliffe’s ethics reform panel, headed by former Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling, a Republican, and former Rep. Rick Boucher, D-9th, recommended empowering a new bipartisan Ethics Review Commission that would have the authority to approve waivers to the gift limit, investigate complaints and impose civil penalties for violations. Del. Jennifer L. McClellan, D-Richmond, is the sponsor of House Bill 1947 that would establish the independent commission with investigative subpoena power.

 
 
Feb2

Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe and the Republican-controlled General Assembly appear to agree they need to toughen Virginia's public ethics laws, but they disagree on how tough they should be. Lawmakers have introduced dozens of ethics bills in the wake of former Republican Gov. Bob McDonnell's conviction on public corruption charges last year. The first public airing of those proposals came Monday at a meeting of a House ethics subcommittee.

Jan31

Across Virginia, people living with life-threatening and debilitating diseases are struggling to afford their medications, despite paying monthly health insurance premiums. This is because health insurers are increasingly shifting away from the traditional three-tiered cost structure — with co-pay limits for each tier — to a structure that moves medications to “specialty tiers” with no co-pay limits. As a result, for many of the sickest patients, the predictable, affordable co-pay is no more.

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The 2017 General Assembly Session adjourned sine die on February 25th after completing work on thousands of bills and resolutions and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall in the budget. The adopted $107 million budget avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, provides assistance to school divisions like Charles City County that have experienced at least a 5% decline in enrollment, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve for future shortfalls.

 

The 2017 General Assembly Session adjourned sine die on February 25th after completing work on thousands of bills and resolutions and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall in the budget. The adopted $107 million budget avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, provides assistance to school divisions like Charles City County that have experienced at least a 5% decline in enrollment, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve for future shortfalls.

 
The General Assembly adjourned sine die on February 25th, completing work on thousands of bills and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall. 

The $107 million budget adopted by the General Assembly that avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve to be used to close future shortfalls.  

You can read an overview of the budget conference report prepared by the Senate Finance Committee here, and one prepared by the House Appropriations Committee here. Specific budget amendments adopted by the final budget conference report can be found here

The General Assembly also passed over 800 other bills than now await the Governor's action.  The Richmond Times Dispatch provided an overview of 25 of the most significant bills that passed, which you can read here.  The Governor has until March 27th to amend or veto any bills. We will return April 5th for Veto Session to vote on his actions. 

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