Meet Senator Jennifer McClellan
Jennifer McClellan's legislation is signed into law
Jennifer McClellan at the General Assembly
Senator McClellan Meets with constituents
Jennifer McClellan accepting the VEA Legislative Champion Award

Latest News

Feb14

Far too often, the General Assembly is forced to address a long-standing problem in response to a tragedy and intense media attention. For example, it took the Virginia Tech and Deeds family tragedies to spur action to address long-simmering problems with our mental health system. This year, the murders of Morgan Harrington and Hannah Graham, and the firestorm unleashed by the Rolling Stone article about sexual assaults at the University of Virginia have sparked action on how college campuses should deal with such incidents. Given the complex nature of sexual assault cases and the multiple federal and criminal laws that already apply, taking action in the pressure cooker of a 45-day session is not an easy task.

Feb12

A bill to remove the requirement to indicate a criminal record on government employment applications died in a House subcommittee Wednesday. The measure was considered Wednesday by the Civil Law Subcommittee of the House Courts of Justice Committee. It died on a non-recorded voice vote to “gently” lay the bill on the table.

Del. Jennifer McClellan, D-Richmond, noted that the bill would provide only a starting point in the job application process. It would afford applicants the chance for an interview without their felony immediately disqualifying them, she said. “This is only at the entry level – getting your foot in the door,” said McClellan, a member of the subcommittee. “The point here is that … when you have that box on an application and it is checked, no matter who you are, it’s a scarlet letter; you’re not even getting in.”

Feb6

Del. Jennifer McClellan (left), D-Richmond, welcomes Charlottesville civil rights leaders Lorraine and Eugene Williams to the House of Delegates on Friday after they were recognized for their work in the community.

Feb5

Virginia is one of only three states in the nation where public breast-feeding is not protected by law. On Friday, the famously female-unfriendly legislature is poised to take the first step toward changing that. The House of Delegates is going to vote on a long-overdue bill that gives women the right to nurse their infants anywhere. The way it stands, a mom and her nursing infant can get kicked out of a gym, a store or a restaurant in Virginia for letting the infant, you know, eat lunch the way some babies do.

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The 2017 General Assembly Session adjourned sine die on February 25th after completing work on thousands of bills and resolutions and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall in the budget. The adopted $107 million budget avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, provides assistance to school divisions like Charles City County that have experienced at least a 5% decline in enrollment, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve for future shortfalls.

 

The 2017 General Assembly Session adjourned sine die on February 25th after completing work on thousands of bills and resolutions and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall in the budget. The adopted $107 million budget avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, provides assistance to school divisions like Charles City County that have experienced at least a 5% decline in enrollment, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve for future shortfalls.

 
The General Assembly adjourned sine die on February 25th, completing work on thousands of bills and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall. 

The $107 million budget adopted by the General Assembly that avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve to be used to close future shortfalls.  

You can read an overview of the budget conference report prepared by the Senate Finance Committee here, and one prepared by the House Appropriations Committee here. Specific budget amendments adopted by the final budget conference report can be found here

The General Assembly also passed over 800 other bills than now await the Governor's action.  The Richmond Times Dispatch provided an overview of 25 of the most significant bills that passed, which you can read here.  The Governor has until March 27th to amend or veto any bills. We will return April 5th for Veto Session to vote on his actions.