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Read my Report to the 9th Senate District for a summary of key legislation, as well as my bills, that passed during the 2017 General Assembly Session.

Virginia's Sales Tax Holiday begins on Friday, August 4th and runs through Sunday, August 6th. During the sales tax holiday, you can buy qualifying school supplies, clothing, footwear, hurricane and emergency preparedness items, and Energy Star and WaterSense products without paying sales tax.
 
Detailed lists of qualifying items and more information for retailers can be found in the 2017 Sales Tax Holiday Guidelines.
 
On July 1, 2017, the majority of legislation passed by the 2017 General Assembly Session took effect. In Due Course, published by the Division of Legislative Services, gives a good overview of newly effective enacted laws that is likely to affect the daily lives of Virginians.  
 
Complete information on actions of the 2017 Session can be found on the Legislative Information System website.
Earlier today EMILY's List announced its finalists for the Gabby Giffords Rising Star award, which celebrates an extraordinary woman serving in state or local office. I am incredibly honored to be one of the six women nominated nationwide!

The General Assembly will reconvene on Wednesday, April 5th to consider the Governor's amendments and vetoes to legislation passed during Session. You can read my preview here.

The 2017 General Assembly Session adjourned sine die on February 25th after completing work on thousands of bills and resolutions and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall in the budget. The adopted $107 million budget avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, provides assistance to school divisions like Charles City County that have experienced at least a 5% decline in enrollment, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve for future shortfalls.

 

The 2017 General Assembly Session adjourned sine die on February 25th after completing work on thousands of bills and resolutions and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall in the budget. The adopted $107 million budget avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, provides assistance to school divisions like Charles City County that have experienced at least a 5% decline in enrollment, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve for future shortfalls.

 
The General Assembly adjourned sine die on February 25th, completing work on thousands of bills and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall. 

The $107 million budget adopted by the General Assembly that avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve to be used to close future shortfalls.  

You can read an overview of the budget conference report prepared by the Senate Finance Committee here, and one prepared by the House Appropriations Committee here. Specific budget amendments adopted by the final budget conference report can be found here

The General Assembly also passed over 800 other bills than now await the Governor's action.  The Richmond Times Dispatch provided an overview of 25 of the most significant bills that passed, which you can read here.  The Governor has until March 27th to amend or veto any bills. We will return April 5th for Veto Session to vote on his actions. 

The 2017 General Assembly Session adjourned sine die Saturday, February 25th after completing work on thousands of bills and resolutions and closing a $1.26 billion shortfall in the budget. The $107 million budget adopted by the General Assembly avoids cuts to K-12 education, restores pay raises to state employees, provides the state share of a raise to teachers, and invests in mental health reform, while creating a $35 million cash reserve to be used to close future shortfalls.
Three of my bills passed the General Assembly and now await action by the Governor.

We’re in the final days of the 2017 Session, and are scheduled to adjourn Saturday, if not sooner. A number of controversial bills have already been vetoed by the Governor this week.  First, HB 1582 (Campbell) would have expanded eligibility for concealed handgun permits for individuals 18 years or older an on active military duty or have been honorably discharged from service. The Governor vetoed this bill because weapons training provided as a component of an individual’s military basic training does not qualify that individual to carry weapons after service.  Under the bill, an individual who completed basic training but was subsequently disqualified from having access to weapons could apply for a concealed handgun permit.

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